Addressing the Cyber Security Skills Gap with Apprenticeships

Blogs

The Cyber Security Skills and the UK’s Critical National Infrastructure report from Parliament’s Joint Committee on the National Security Strategy has said the gap between the demand and the supply of skilled workers for the critical national infrastructure sector is a “cause for alarm” and the government has “no real sense of the scale of the problem or how to address it effectively”.

Major cyber crime incidents are becoming increasingly common, and when they do happen, they make headline news. Millions of customers can have their data leaked, some might even have their accounts compromised, and there can be major financial implications. The problem is that many small businesses see this as something only for large organisations to worry about. But in truth, companies of all sizes need to be aware of cybersecurity and how it affects their everyday operations.

The most important thing to think about when you consider your responsibilities is that you most likely have control over the safety of other people’s assets. This ranges from their data to the money they might have in an account with you. As a result, you have a responsibility to keep these assets safe, and in an online world, good cyber security is the way you do this.

If a hacker manages to gain access to your systems and they take someone’s data, then you are likely at fault as well as the hacker. You should be doing everything reasonable within your power to ensure that this kind of thing doesn’t happen.

Of course, you do need to think about your own business too. While it may not be a legal responsibility, everyone in the business has some degree of responsibility for keeping it cyber secure to prevent incidents from occurring.

Back in February of this year, we interviewed Stewart Hyde on significant incidents in Cybersecurity in 2017 and how we can learn from them. Stuart Hyde QPM is a retired UK chief constable who has helped to lead the UK police response to issues on the Internet. He holds an honorary doctorate for his national commitment to cybercrime prevention and detection and is the vice president of both the Society for the Policing of Cyberspace (POLCYB) and the High Tech Crime Consortium (HTCC).

Working in partnership with Stuart Hyde, we created an e-learning module 'Cybersecurity Awareness' to help educate people on how they can help to reduce cybercrime and promote cybersecurity in your everyday role.  https://www.virtual-college.co.uk/courses/business-courses/cyber-security-introduction

We have now gone one step further and from September 2018 we will be offering Level 4 Cyber Security Apprenticeships to help businesses address the skills gap in this area in the most affordable way. Our tutor has a wealth of qualifications and experience within the Cybersecurity sector having taught up to degree level, so you can be assured the skills and expertise that will be passed on to your staff will be high quality and deserving of a Level 4 Qualification. You can either upskill an existing member of staff or recruit an apprentice in to your business.

Imagine having your own Cybersecurity Technologist? Our apprenticeships can help you create your own.

What will the apprentice learn?

  • System Vulnerabilities
  • Analysis and evaluation of security threats and hazards
  • Demonstration of the use of relevant external sources of threat intelligence or advice
  • Research and investigation of some common attack techniques
  • Security risk assessments
  • Development of security cases
  • Troubleshooting
  • Design, build and testing of networks
  • Configuration of security hardware/software
  • Employment of cryptography
  • Cyber risk assessments
  • Risk assessment methodolgies.

Each apprentice will also complete the MTA Professional Vendor Qualification, Security Fundamentals.

For more information on our Cybersecurity Apprenticeships please get in touch:

t: 01325 328827

e: [email protected]

Melanie Thompson Author